4 C I T A T I O N S : “Par le mot par commence donc ce texte”

FOUR CITATIONS

To cite: to disseminatively and indefinitely machinate mirror effects of difference and repetition. To cite is citare, to shake and make tremble, and it affects it all, sollus: to sollicitate. It is the mirror of the citation that sollicitates, fissuring along all planes of the mirror-cite making the text imperceptible. The mirroring effect of disseminatively machinated differences and repetitions en abyme, however, is not that of a mimesis; there is no hidden and accessible proper and unique meaning, therefore, beneath some layer sub-ject to archaeological de-sedimentation. The text “implique que quelque part l’être d’un êtant soit imité.” Text is never comparable to an absolutely faithful imitation of a truth always already reproducible and repeatable by the text. “Il n’y a pas de hors-texte.”

S O L L I C I T A T I O N

Sollicitation is seismics of signs.

Never yielding to the oppositional game of metaphysics itself, and reminding us that effects of sollicitation also happens automatically and as if auto-affected, Derrida rather tries to make us aware of the necessity of fissuring the entire edifice of totalitarian and reductionist oppositional and hierarchical terms and series. Derrida’s sollicitation is a necessary counter-violence. Every totality can be shown to be founded upon that which it excludes, that is, that which would become excessive for the reductive analysis of becomings into formulas. As for instance is the case with the old philosopheme arkhē that cartels the senses of founding, origin, principle, commencement [phusis] and that of commandment, government, sovereignty [thesis, tekhnē, nomos], principle and prince, hence the etymological link between archeology and monarchy. Sollicitation would demonstrate the differential excess secretly constituting the very conditions of possibility of arkhē. Thus, also implying its conditions of impossibility. Arkhē commenced as meaning in the nomological sense: to the arkhē as commandment, coming from the Greek arkheion, “initially a house, a domicile, and address, the residence of the superior magistrates, the archons, those who commanded.”